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Opinion

Phantasm

Phantasm (1979): A Review and Opinion

Phantasm, directed by Don Coscarelli, is a science fiction horror film from 1979 that revolves around two brothers and the mystery surrounding a figure known only as the Tall Man.

Psychology of Psycho

The Psychology of Psycho (1960): An Opinion Piece

The character of Norman Bates was inspired by the infamous killer, Ed Gein. Many die-hard horror fans may recognize this name. It is the same man who inspired the creations of Leatherface (Texas Chainsaw Massacre), Buffalo Bill and Hannibal Lecter (Silence of the Lambs), and various other terrifying characters.

The Perfection

The Perfection (2019): A Review

Charlotte (Allison Williams, Get Out) was once a cello prodigy studying at the Bachoff Academy of Music. Her music career came to an abrupt stop when she was forced to drop out of the academy to take care of her sick mother. Years later her mother has finally passed, and Charlotte has the freedom to choose her own path once more.

The Thing

The Thing (2011) As A Prequel: A Pale Comparison

During the opening scenes of John Carpenter’s 1982 horror classic The Thing, we follow a two man crew of Norwegians chasing a dog across the Antarctic tundra by way of helicopter. The Norwegians land near an American base camp, getting killed due to mental errors and a language barrier that prevents them from conveying the danger that will follow the Americans if the dog lives.

The Wolfman

The Wolfman Films (1941) and (2010)

Everyone loves a good werewolf story, with the gory details and the sad, isolated lives of those who have been cursed with lycanthropy. The 1941 film produced by Universal Studios, The Wolfman was one of the first ever on screen appearances of a werewolf and their lore.

They Live

John Carpenter’s They Live (1988)

From the many original and unique films created by John Carpenter, the film “They Live”, released in 1988, mirrors modern society perfectly while adding a horror aspect that frightens anyone to their core. The strong and bold social commentary throughout the film portrayed through the subtle symbols of the growing homeless population and the increasing wealth gap presented to the audience.

Jaws

Jaws, Knowledge, and Experience

In the movie Jaws (1975), Hooper irritably mocks Quint for his “working-class hero” shtick. It’s a throwaway line in the film, but I always saw it as a much-needed moment of self-awareness about the dynamic between those two characters: the tension between the two characters does hark to the traditional “working-class hero versus the wealthy academic” trope.